• Monday, November 28, 2022

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Zayn Malik shares sweet childhood photo as he appeals to extend free school meals for children living in poverty

By: Pramod Thomas

British singer Zayn Malik has appealed to help feed needy families as he promoted sales of a clothing range by sharing a photo from his school days in Bradford.

The former One Direction star posted a black and white photograph from his time at Lower Fields Primary Academy on Instagram.

The clothing range includes messages such as ‘Save the Future’ and ‘Feed the Children’ and the money raised from the sales will go to the feedingbritain.org charity.

The East Bowling-born Malik was recently in the news when he wrote an open letter to British prime minister Rishi Sunak, urging him to offer free school meals for all children whose families are on Universal Credit.

According to reports, around 800,000 children in the UK are living in poverty, but still do not qualify for free school meals.

Malik, 29, was one of the many children who relied on free school lunches.

“Together we can help save the future. Together we can help protect families. Together we can help by providing meals to those suffering from hunger, poverty, and food insecurities,” Malik, who recently became an ambassador for the UK charity Food Foundation, wrote on Instagram. Now, the singer supports the organisation’s Feed the Future campaign.

“100 per cent of the proceeds from these shirts will be donated to @feeding_britain. No child should have to suffer the trauma and stigma of hunger and poverty,” he said.

”We want every child to grow up healthy and lead productive lives #freeschoolmeals.”

 

Malik has 4.74 million followers on Instagram and the latest post crossed over 2 million likes within hours.

He is the latest famous name to support wider access to free school meals, joining England football star Marcus Rashford and celebrity chef Jamie Oliver.

According to figures from the British government, 1.9 million children in England, or 22.5 per cent of all students, are eligible for free school meals.

All infant-school students are eligible for free meals, but children in Year 3 and above must live in a household receiving income-related benefits, with an annual income of no more than £7,400 after tax and before welfare payments.

However, approximately 40 per cent of people who receive universal credit have jobs and may earn more than this amount.

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